Blogs

Will Today’s Tests Improve Airport Security?

In anticipation of ever-evolving threats to airport security, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Transportation Security Administration (TSA) continue to explore and test new ways to enhance airport security and protect the traveling public. Unfortunately, as this article was being created, a terrorist bombing on a train in London was a sobering call for hyper-vigilance and ways to safeguard passengers in all forms of mass transportation as well as people gathered in public places (on the street as well as inside large venues) as we’ve seen in Paris and Las Vegas.

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These are the Best Airports in the World

Since flyers around the globe can choose where they depart from and arrive at, airports are competing for market share. That’s why the World Airport Awards, the most prestigious annual ranking of the world's best airports, is a very big deal. While our scanners focus on balancing two of the key performance parameters addressed by the Skytrax survey—passenger safety and convenience—our airport operations friends have many more to manage, including facility comfort, location of bathrooms, and the language skills of their staff. Ranking results are based on the impressions of nearly 14 million flyers from 105 countries ...

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Super Bowl LII Security: Eyes Everywhere and on the Budget

The NFL’s 2017-18 season kicked off last week, and fans are excited about their favorite team’s chances to play in the Super Bowl—one of the most super-hyped happenings in the U.S. that draws world attention and attendance. Whether you view it as THE football event of the year or just another excuse for a party, the big game has to be one of THE biggest security challenges for any host city. And a costly one to boot. Beyond jaw-dropping, security costs for the last several Super Bowls continue t...

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Screening Liquids for Explosives at the Airport

Some screening technologies automatically detect liquid explosives—even if they're in sealed bottles. These detection technologies each have some limitations, however. Some use scattered lasers that hit a target and then reflect back to a receiver device for analysis. Lasers can register the molecular properties of the sampled materials and compare them to a database. The problem with laser devices is that their beams can't get through opaque containers, like ceramic. Another method for detecting liquid explosives involves X-rays. A new alternative—the MobiLab BLS—is the most effective product in the marketplace at screening liquids for explosives. In years past, boarding an airp...

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